Wednesday, December 27, 2017

Sifting through the clues of the "Truly Canadian" Sherman Mystery

Apotex Company Logo

Like millions of Canadians, during the past two weeks I have been intrigued and at times mesmerized by the recent violent deaths and ensuing mystery surrounding the double death of Apotex CEO Barry Sherman and his wife Honey. The elite Toronto couple were found dead, side by side, in the basement of their Toronto home on December 15, 2017.

This case has all the elements of a "great crime story". Money, politics, murder and mystery. Was the hanging deaths of Barry and Honey a murder/suicide or a double suicide as the police seem to think? Or, was the couple murdered by what would appear to be very professional hit men?

All across Canada, people are talking in hushed tones about the various clues and probabilities. One of the best sources of information that I've found has been the National Post article that I have linked above.

The media focus seems to be on Barry's life long litigious nature. He wielded the law as a weapon to financially bludgeon business rivals, relatives and architectural and building contractors alike. He even sued the Canadian government to block an investigation into the dubious election fundraising activities he did on behalf of Canadian Prime Minister, Justin Trudeau. Ultimately, Barry Sherman's entire fortune was built on suing anyone who stood in his way...but mainly Pharmaceutical Companies for the right to manufacture generic knock offs of their drugs. But, where did wife Honey come in on this?

The National Post article contains an important clue. It describes how Barry's social climbing wife Honey's hobby and avocation was philanthropy. Good deeds were Honey's stock in trade. Barry had been quoted as saying that he indulged Honey's hobby largely because it helped to create a positive public image:
“Power and wealth bring an opportunity to derive an extra measure of happiness by acting to help others, be it family, friends, members of our community, our country, or mankind at large,” he wrote. “Individuals who help others to an unusual extent are considered to be ‘kind,’ ‘moral’ or generous,’ although, if my thesis that everything is done in pursuit of happiness is correct, then there can be no such thing as (altruism), kindness, generosity or morality...."

But Honey also used her social and philanthropic skills to forge important business connections for Barry....below is the most significant example. Please read and I will have more thoughts in comments to follow:

When Honey Sherman asked to meet Aubrey Dan, son of her billionaire husband’s bitter [generic drug manufacturing] rival, Leslie Dan, she arrived in his boardroom with a ball cap on, ready to pitch a project that would bring them together.

It was in the early 2000s. Their families had been business rivals since “the heydays of the ’80s,” Aubrey said. But when Honey arrived for lunch at his office for the midday meeting, she appealed to their common ground.

“We both come from the drug industry,” Aubrey said.

The idea Honey had was a Jewish-focused community service for those struggling with addiction. And when she spoke, Aubrey remembered, she spoke warmly. So the project began, and the unlikely pair “just clicked". 
 .....
After connecting with Aubrey, the pair’s professional relationship gave way to a personal one that drew her husband into the mix.

By the end of the Shermans’ lives, the two men and former rivals would be sending emails back and forth about the ideal formulations to put medical marijuana into a pill.

This clue leads me to my last source of possible hints as to what caused the Shermans' lives to suddenly implode. I will reprint the Reuters article Of October 31, 2017 in its entirety. Please carefully read this article, posted about six weeks prior to the December 15th deaths of the couple. When I read this article yesterday, something caused the hairs on the back of my neck to stand up...a very good sign that I was on to something. Imagine you are Barry Sherman having your morning coffee last October 31 and read the following:


*********************

U.S. states allege broad generic drug price-fixing collusion


By Karen Freifell

Reuters October 31, 2017
WASHINGTON (Reuters) - A large group of U.S. states accused key players in the generic drug industry of a broad price-fixing conspiracy, moving on Tuesday to widen an earlier lawsuit to add many more drugmakers and medicines in an action that sent some company shares tumbling. The lawsuit, brought by the attorneys general of 45 states and the District of Columbia, accused 18 companies and subsidiaries and named 15 medicines. It also targeted two individual executives: Rajiv Malik, president and executive director of Mylan NV, and Satish Mehta, CEO and managing director of India’s Emcure Pharmaceuticals.

Shares of Pennsylvania-based Mylan, also named as a defendant, closed down 6.6 percent.

The states said the drugmakers and executives divided customers for their drugs among themselves, agreeing that each company would have a certain percentage of the market. The companies sometimes agreed on price increases in advance, the states added. The states said Malik and Mehta spoke directly to one another to agree on their companies’ shares of the market for a delayed-release version of a common antibiotic, doxycycline hyclate.

“It is our belief that price-fixing is systematic, it is pervasive, and that a culture of collusion exists in the industry,” Connecticut Attorney General George Jepsen, who is leading the case, told a news conference in Hartford.


The lawsuit, brought by the attorneys general of 45 states and the District of Columbia, accused 18 companies and subsidiaries and named 15 medicines. It also targeted two individual executives: Rajiv Malik, president and executive director of Mylan NV, and Satish Mehta, CEO and managing director of India’s Emcure Pharmaceuticals. Shares of Pennsylvania-based Mylan, also named as a defendant, closed down 6.6 percent. The states said the drugmakers and executives divided customers for their drugs among themselves, agreeing that each company would have a certain percentage of the market. The companies sometimes agreed on price increases in advance, the states added.  
The states said Malik and Mehta spoke directly to one another to agree on their companies’ shares of the market for a delayed-release version of a common antibiotic, doxycycline hyclate.

“It is our belief that price-fixing is systematic, it is pervasive, and that a culture of collusion exists in the industry,” Connecticut Attorney General George Jepsen, who is leading the case, told a news conference in Hartford.

Mylan said in a statement it had found no evidence of price-fixing by the company or any of its employees, and vowed to defend itself vigorously. Malik, the company’s second-ranking official, has received more than $50 million in compensation over the past three years, last year making more than CEO Heather Bresch. “Mylan has deep faith in the integrity of its president, Rajiv Malik, and stands behind him fully,” the company said. Emcure, also a defendant in the case, did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Two former executives of Emcure’s subsidiary Heritage Pharmaceuticals pleaded guilty in January to federal charges of conspiring to fix prices and divide up the market for doxycycline and the diabetes drug glyburide. The two men, former Heritage president Jason Malek and former chairman and chief executive Jeffrey Glazer, reached a deal with 41 states and territories in which they each agreed to pay $25,000 and cooperate with the state probe.

Soaring drug prices from both branded and generic drug manufacturers have sparked outrage and investigations in the United States. President Donald Trump this year accused pharmaceutical companies of “getting away with murder” with their drug pricing. 
Executives like Mylan’s Bresch and former Turing Pharmaceuticals CEO Martin Shkreli have been called in front of Congress to defend the cost of their products.

MORE COMPANIES TARGETED

The original complaint, filed in December, targeted Mylan, Heritage, Aurobindo Pharma USA Inc, Citron Pharma LLC, Mayne Pharma USA Inc and Teva Pharmaceuticals USA Inc. The states are pressing a new complaint that would add Novartis AG’s unit Sandoz, India-based Sun Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd, Endo International PLC’s unit Par Pharmaceutical, Dr. Reddy’s Laboratories, Apotex Corp, Glenmark Generics Ltd, Lannett Company Inc, Alkem Laboratories Ltd’s unit Ascend Laboratories and Cadila Healthcare Ltd’s unit Zydus Pharmaceuticals Inc.
Jepsen said the investigation is continuing, and that claims would likely be brought against more companies, and possibly executives, in the future.

The news hurt shares of companies named in the expanded suit that are traded in the United States. In addition to Mylan’s drop, Lannett lost 13.7 percent. Shares of Endo were up 7 percent, but down from their 12 percent peak before the news of the amended lawsuit. Teva spokeswoman Denise Bradley said the company denied the allegations. Endo spokeswoman Heather Lubeski said the company would vigorously defend itself against the claims. Other companies did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

The expansion of the suit requires the court’s permission. The original lawsuit centered on just two medicines, delayed-release doxycycline and glyburide. The price of doxycycline rose from $20 for 500 tablets to $1,849 between October 2013 and May 2014, according to U.S. Senator Amy Klobuchar, a Minnesota Democrat who had been pressing for action on high drug prices.

The amended complaint would expand the number of drugs to include glipizide-metformin and glyburide-metformin, which are among the most commonly used diabetes treatments. Others include: acetazolamide, which is used to treat glaucoma and epilepsy; the antibiotic doxycycline monohydrate; the blood pressure medicine fosinopril; the anti-anxiety medicine meprobamate; and the calcium channel blocking agent nimodipine. The U.S. Justice Department is conducting a parallel criminal investigation. On Friday, the department asked the Pennsylvania court presiding over the lawsuit to put the lawsuit’s discovery process on hold, saying it could interfere with the criminal probe.

Connecticut Assistant Attorney General Joseph Nielsen said on Tuesday the states would likely oppose that request, which could slow the lawsuit." 

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It would appear from the above Reuters report, Barry Sherman was in store for the legal battle of his 75-year-old life. Shortly after the couple's deaths, I read an early report that Barry was slated to be "examined for discovery" in connection with the above price-fixing case being organized by 45 US State attorneys. The battle against price fixing in the Generic Drug Industry appears to be spearheaded by the Trump Administration. But, but but, Barry Sherman had thrown his lot in with Trumps' enemies...the democrats...or at least the Canadian version...Justin "le dauphin" Trudeau.

I can only imagine how big this case is and how deep the tentacles of Drug Fixing go in the Deep State and its current civil war going on between elements of the CIA, Pentagon, FBI, DHS, White House, etc.

Now, factoring in the above bombshell event into the life of Barry Sherman and his partner Honey (who could have also been named as a co-conspirator in the price fixing because she set Barry up with his rivals)...it would appear there are two possibilities.

- One: Barry realized the jig was up and rather than put himself through a grueling "examination for discovery" of a case that could very well end up destroying his entire life work and fortune....he decided to end it...and take Honey to prevent her having to testify.

Or

- Two: Barry had decided to "sing like a canary" and implicate others in return for being let off lightly....in which case his long time enemies may have decided to pre-emptively shut up the would be canaries.

One way or the other, my instincts tell me that the price fixing case is at the root of the mystery....and THAT, my friends, is why you will never read about it or any journalistic effort to connect the obvious dotz in the main$tream newz.

4 comments:

tsisageya said...

Or, three, it's a a fake phony show for who-knows-why?

greencrow said...

Hi tsisageya

Are you suggesting nobody died?

gc

Reading between the lines said...

Good job connecting the dotz greencrow .I do believe you are on to the real reasons why they died . I was not aware of the of the collusion within big pharma but does not surprise me at all. They are modern day gangsters .

greencrow said...

Hi RBTL:

Thanks for your comment. I found another clue after I posted which is at this link:

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/toronto/barry-sherman-honey-sherman-apotex-deaths/article37424109/

The clue is the salient fact that Honey purchased the property for her new home under her own name. Perhaps she was planning a separation from Barry. This is the most dangerous time in a woman's life, statistically speaking.

gc